Punching the Clock

Photo by Jill Wellington on Pexels.com

This is a tough one.  There were good things and bad things about every job I have had.  As a kid my sister and I made money shoveling the walks for two different retired woman who each lived alone.  And when the holidays were over an elderly couple across the street would leave to visit family out of town and we shoveled their sidewalk while they were gone – and it was a LONG corner lot sidewalk.

Then as I gathered more independence, I ventured into two normal kid’s jobs – babysitting and a newspaper route.  My mom put an end to that after a couple of boys from Iowa were kidnapped doing their paper routes.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I concentrated on grades and a small social life in high school.  Then after the first and only year of college I went to work for a local restaurant nights.  I later on picked up a second job at a fast food joint.  That didn’t last long.  So, I decided to try retail and became a cashier.  I worked at the store and restaurant for about 7 years.  Then left the restaurant after I had my daughter.  This was so I could be with my daughter nights while working days… my husband taking opposite shifts, so we didn’t need a lot of babysitting time.

For a shot time I did some grain book-keeping for an elevator, it was basically a data entry job.  That was a nice job as it was in my in-law’s basement helping my mother-in-law.  But flooding and a sale of the elevator to the Coop made that job obsolete. 

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

So, going with longevity I would say my cashier job was the best at 20 years.  Like any job though it wasn’t the same in the end.  Management changed several times and the importance of the front end was swept under the carpet so to speak.  Then I got sick and the lack of compassion from those I had worked many years with left me with a very bad taste in my mouth. 

Thank you and have a nice day!

Even thought the end was rough I still loved being a cashier on most days.  I had regular customers and friends that made the job enjoyable.  If I ever find that miracle cure, I would consider returning.  But I don’t see that happening any time soon.


Written for Fandango’s Dog Days of August (FDDA) – your best job ever

Monday To Remember

Image from Google search

I hate Monday

It takes you away

I have you such a short time

And then you’re back with her

You say you have to work late

You have a late meeting

You have an overnight stay out of town

I have learned the truth though

You work your nine to five

Then you go to her

If I am lucky I see you after dinner

Too tired to talk you go to bed

You shower before I can

Smell her perfume on you

I guess I should be glad

You are still here weekends

I haven’t lost you completely

Even though you get “work calls”

That taint the day with heartache

***

This Monday will be different

I will no longer share you

I won’t be toyed with anymore

This is your last Monday to split

This is the last of you

All it takes is one bullet


Written for Fandango’s Dog Days of August (FDDA) #3 – Monday

Her Shot At Victory

Photo by One Shot on Pexels.com

Tom came into the kitchen where Mary was fixing dinner.  “Big new at work.  JoAnn is up for the vice presidency.  There have been whispers about it all day.”

“Why is that?  Do they think a woman can’t handle it?  Or is it more of she doesn’t have a fair chance at it?”

“No this is monumental for us.  This is not some arbitrary shot at victory, if she gets this promotion it will mean big changes in the company.  And I’d venture to say it is about time for most of them.”

“Well then I hope she gets it.”


Written for Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (FOWC) – arbitrary

You Did What

Grandmother And Granddaughter Clipart

“Grandma did you go to work when you were younger?”

“I did before I met your Grandfather.”

“Why did you quit?”

“It was a different time and I had to make the tough decision.  I vacillated between being a stay at home mom or working while your mom and aunt were in school.”

“You did what between staying home and working?”

“Vacillated… it means went back and forth between two thoughts.”

“Oh, okay.  When you worked, what did you do?”

“I worked at a grocery store, a dry cleaner’s and I was like a babysitter for a family for a while.  Why are you asking sweetheart?”

“We have to do a paper on working women of the 50’s and Mom said you were born that long ago.”


Written for Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (FOWC) – vacillate

(Clip art from Google search)

A Work In Progress

What Can Neighbors Do About the Abandoned House Next Door ...

Shutters were just barely hanging on by the windows.  Ivy and weeds concealed almost half of the house.  Inside the house was covered in a layer of dust thick enough to write your name in.  The lackluster paint was peeling off the walls.  It looked like years of neglect had taken a toll on this house.  But even in this condition she could see so much more.  There was under all that dust a beautiful hard wood floor.  Paint can easily be replaced, and soap and water should do the rest.  It would take work, but this was now home,

 

Written for Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (FOWC) –lackluster

A Bird In The Hand Is Worth Two In The Bush

brown bird on person s hand
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Susan liked her job. She had been with the company for five years when an opportunity came up for a job with another company.  She currently loved her boss; her clients were great, and she couldn’t complain about her salary and benefits.  Yet there was a small voice saying “what if” to her.  She would have to say good-bye to her coworkers that she had become friends with.  Was it wise to consider this change when things were so good now?  Her decision was made when she remembered what her grandmother used to say, “A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.”

 

Written for Fandango’s February Expressions (FFE) #28

Break Time Stories

Tina and Ann were in the break-room alone.  They were kind of huddled up close across the table.  Tina whispered, “Did you hear the latest dirt about Karen in accounting?”

Ann got a shocked look on her face and said, “No, what has Miss Perfect done?  Will it knock her off her high horse?”

Tina began, “I heard the police came to her house…” she was interrupted by Dave walking into the break-room. “Ann, my break is over.  I will talk to you after work, ok?”

Ann, hungry for more gossip said, “Sure, see you at five o’clock out front.”

 

Written for Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (FOWC) – dirt

The Project

He stood by the desk, slouched over with a bad look on his face.  He looked like he wanted to be anywhere else.  Another man approached him and said, “Tom, you look like someone stole your car, what’s up buddy?”

Tom said, “It’s this project.  I just can’t get excited about it at all.  It is just not my cup of tea.”

The man said, “Being apathetic about it isn’t going to make it go any better.  You should just grin and bare it.  It will all be done by next week.”

Tom sighed and said, “You’re right, thanks Fred.”

 

Written for Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (FOWC) – apathetic

 

 

Mumbles … public

Everyone, at some point in their life, should have to do two jobs. Any job having to do with working with the public. And also a little time in a food service job. They both teach you a lot about how to be a better customer, because there are some of us when placed in the public pool that act completely rude.

I have had jobs with the public both early (a paper carrier complete with collections needed on the route) and late (a cashier at a discount store) in life, and I can’t say one time was easier than the other. But I sure learned things about people in both situations.

People don’t think… they just speak. Favorite story working in retail was a slow day (a lot of them were) and a customer approached me looking for lint rollers. I easily directed her to the ones right by the check outs. She stared at the package (which pictured a dog and cat) and asked if it removed anything besides pet hair. While I WANTED to say no, it leaves everything else behind, I did say and point out on the label where it removed dirt, dust, hair, lint, the usual things a lint brush removes. But she had been dead serious when she asked if it took more than pet hair off. She just didn’t think.

I learned a few things in food service too. First of all it can be a lot of hard work if you are in a busy popular restaurant. I worked at both a popular restaurant and a fast food place. People can be downright rude about their food. The wait staff and kitchen have no problems with food being sent back, but do it in a nice tone. I recall on more that one occasion getting cheeseburgers sent back for no cheese… hello, that is called a hamburger then, don’t order it as a cheeseburger. And there are always those who don’t actually read the menu and act surprised when their food comes out with something on it they didn’t want. READ the menu, don’t just look at the pictures.

Sadly there are things I do now that I no longer work that make me cringe inside. Believe me cashiers have heard MANY times, “Do you need something to do?” “Are you working here?” (this one is usually asked when in full “uniform”) and the most popular “If there is no price it must be free?” And I should know better than to use those tired sayings, but I still catch myself every once in a while doing so.

Before I stop my mumbling for the day… remember the carts do NOT magically move themselves into the line up. If you want cashiers at registers instead of moving carts around, try putting them away on the way out the door… all the way away, not three steps from the other carts. (Sorry a huge pet peeve of mine when I worked). And when a cashier asks you how your day is, yes it is their job, but if they are a decent cashier, they really do hope you found everything ok. Have a nice day!

 

Written for Fandango’s One-Word Challenge (FOWC) – public